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In the interview with Denis Jackson, that I published yesterday, I shortened his answer to question 9.  The full response is so special that it deserves a post of its own.  So with profuse thanks to Denis Jackson, I herewith conclude GLM V with a world exclusive. 9) Are you tempted to translate Storm’s poetry? […]

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My intention for German Literature Month was, apart from the readalongs and Kleist, to discover new authors.  This post should have been a review of something by E T A Hoffman but after Vishy posted about Immensee during week 1, I found it utterly inconceivable that I should spend a month reading German literature and not pick up anything by […]

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There nothing more intriguing than a mystery surrounding an old painting.    This is the portrait of a dead child, a beautiful little boy,  perhaps five years old; the face rested on a lace-decorated cushion, and the child held a white water lily in his small, pale hand.  In one dark corner of the child’s portrait, four letters written in […]

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 … and he rode up the escalator to the first floor and selected a seat in the corner of the cafeteria with a view of the escalator and the small concourse Never mind the escalator at London City Airport.  Following his reading at this year’s Edinburgh Book Festival, William Boyd had a mountain to climb.  Let […]

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Theodor Storm (1817-1888) began his career as a lyric poet. He eventually turned to prose and the novella became his preferred medium. His poetic gift lent itself well to the form, enabling him to evoke mood, landscape and character with simple yet lyric majesty. He is the prime artisan of poetic realism. Many of his […]

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This volume contains 3 tales; Immensee, The Journey to the Hallig and Hans and Heinz Kirch. Immensee, the nostalgic love story I remember fondly, is so much more, as allegorical in its way as The Great Gatsby. Storm lived in a time of political upheaval, a time when ownership of his home state of Schleswig-Holstein […]

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My love of Theodor Storm’s C19th novellas is well-documented on this blog, as is my admiration for his English translator, Denis Jackson, whose generous response to my Meet the Translator feature (1, 2, 3) is probably the German Literature Month highlight that will never be surpassed. Last month I finally got the opportunity to visit […]

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June 2017 Wrap-Up

I’m currently on the road, so a picture of the 10 books I read in June will follow in due course. (Added 09 08.17)  They are books 54-63 listed in the Read 2017 widget on the right.   There’s a distinctively German feel to books 58 onwards, and that’s because I’m in Germany, currently touring […]

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Shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize Translated from Norwegian by Don Bartlett and Don Shaw Let me say this in advance.  Only one thing would have increased my pleasure while reading this novel of Norwegian island life – and that would have been foul weather in Scotland!  I’m not complaining, but there was a […]

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Winner of the 2011 German Prize for Crime Fiction Translated from German by John Brownjohn Lack of evidence ensured that no-one was ever successfully prosecuted for the 1989 political assassination of pro-independence, anti-apartheid activist, Anton Lubowski. Even if the identities of the killers were known. In The Hour of the Jackal, Jaumann imagines what would […]

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