My love affair with the novella continues unabated.  When bibliofreak informed me of the upcoming November novella challenge, I had a quick whip around the shelves and boxes and within 5 minutes had come up with this pile of contenders …..

2010 Novella Challenge TBR

Organised in three sections. 

The bottom section – translated fiction (excepting German-speaking countries):  From the bottom up:

Gasoline – Quim Monzo / The Garden of Secrets – Juan Goytisolo / A Castle in Romagna – Igor Stiks / Doctor Glas – Hjalmar Soderberg / One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich – Alexander Solzhenitsyn / Red Lights – Georges Simenon / Alphabet of the Night – Jean-Euphele Milce / Bonsai – Alejandro Zambra /Customer Service – Benoit Duteurtre  / The Pathseeker – Imre Kertesz

In the middle: novellas originally penned in English:

Dino Vicelli, Private Eye – Lori Weiner / A Kid for Two Farthings – Wolf Mankowitz / Henrietta’s War – Joyce Dennys / The Island – R J Price / Night Visits – Ron Butlin

At the top:  From Germany and Austria and Switzerland:

Journey from The Past – Stefan Zweig / Portrait of the Mother as A Young Woman – Friedrich Christian Delius / Visitation – Jenny Erpenbeck / The Madwoman on a Pilgrimage – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe / A Minute’s Silence – Siegfried Lenz / Carsten the Trustee – Theodor Storm

At the very top another volume by Theodor Storm – The Rider on the White Horse and other stories.  Strategically placed for a reason.  Storm is the father of  my love for the novella and I’ve written eulogised about his work elsewhere.  Now it’s your chance to see what all my fuss is about because I’ll send a copy of this book to the winner of the following contest.   Not only is it a desirable NYRB edition but it contains three of his very best novellas:  The Rider on the White Horse, Immensee and Aquis Submersus.

Just tell me which of the books in my TBR stack I should read during November and why.  Or maybe you can recommend something else.  For the purposes of this exercise, I’m defining novella as a single story between 60 and 160 pages in length.

Random.org will declare the winner of the contest (which is open worldwide) on Monday 1st November, giving me plenty of time to send the book and you plenty of time to join in the challenge (which would be nice, but not essential!)

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