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For The Record: July-August 2014

 

The read pile for the past two months looks pretty meagre, but then it’s not telling the whole story.

First of all, Hans Fallada’s Little Man, What Now? isn’t pictured.  I had to return it to the library.  

Secondly, I wish to emphasise that for the first time in over 20 years I have read a full-length German novel, Goetheruh, in German!  It’s good to know that I still can.

Thirdly, I was on the road for 3 weeks. 

Fourthly, thanks to said travels, when I pick things up to read in situ, I’ve part-read another five books.  This gives me a head start for the shorter days and longer reading hours of September and October, and For the Record at the end of October should look a little more – shall we say – substantial.

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To kick off Women in Translation Month , let me recommend 5 fabulous reads that I’d love others to discover for themselves.  Listed in alphabetical order of author surname. Links to my original reviews.

Jenny Erpenbeck – Visitation (Translated from German by Susan Bernofsky)

Elena Ferrante – My Brilliant Friend (Translated from Italian by Ann Goldstein)

Yoko Ogawa – Revenge (Translated from Japanese by Stephen Synder)

Clara Sánchez – The Scent of Lemon Leaves (Translated from Spanish by Julie Wark)

Teresa Solana – A Not So Perfect Crime (Translated from Catalan by Peter Bush)

Unfortunately I’m unable to support this event as I’d like, as my August is already hectic (though in a good way).  Still I’ll no doubt keep track of my feed reader and add exponentially to my wishlist …. Have fun!

© Lizzy’s Literary Life (2007-2014)

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For the Record: May-June 2014

 

If the evidence presented by the picture of books read during the last two months is anything to go by, I’ve been busy!

Highlights – May saw me take part on Kim’s Australia and New Zealand Literature month and I travelled to London to attend the IFFP award ceremony.  I haven’t enjoyed myself online as much for ages (#germanlitmonth excepted) as I did during June’s #bookaday event on twitter.  Further adventure as I made a quick trip to the Hebrides both reading wise and in real life.

July will see me blogging about that – in fact, given that the world’s eyes (well, the Commonwealth’s at least) will be turning towards Glasgow (a mere hop, skip and a jump away from my Lanarkshire base), there will follow an impromptu Scottish lit fortnight in the lead up to the Commonwealth Games.  Starting Monday 7th.  Just because ….

July is also Spanish Literature Month (hosted by Richard and Stu) which gives me a bit of a dilemma.  If you’ve seen the Edinburgh International Book Festival programme, you could almost say there’s a mini Spanish lit fest going on.  I’m hoping to attend events featuring Cercas, Laub, Neuman, Vila-Matas and legendary translator Margaret Jull Costa.  So I will be reading plenty of Spanish lit during July, but may not review until after the events in August. We’ll see whether time permits some none #edbookfest reads.. Surely I can slot in a couple of short stories somewhere ….

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#bookaday June 23-30

Time for the final batch of #bookaday nominations.   I really enjoyed myself this month – taking time out to reflect on some favourites and others  not so much so,  instead of constantly chasing to review the next new thing.  #bookaday will continue as #bookadayuk for the foreseeable future and I’ll continue to play on twitter.  See you there?

For now though, let’s complete #bookaday June 2014 in orderly fashion.  Scroll down for previous entries.

June 23 – Made to read at school

That phrase implies something negative and so, here’s the book that tortured me at German A-level.  Call Don Carlos what you will.  I have. Many, many times.

 

Apologies to Schiller.  The companion play in the pictured volume, Mary Stuart, is superb.

 

June 24 – Hooked me into reading

My teachers didn’t always get it wrong and this O-level English literature choice was inspirational.   It showed me just how great the best literature can be and ensured I became a lifelong bookworm.

 

Of course, To Kill A Mockingbird is now banned from the English Literature syllabus, as post-1914 titles must be British. Parochialism rules! Where would we be without the astute wisdom of our politicians?

June 25 – Never finished it

I was surprised at the shame many tweeters felt at not finishing their nomination in this category.  Not me.   9-pages of that Irish novel, Uly-something, was more than enough. 

 

June 26 – Should have sold more copies

Title changes occur between editions to boost sales, and I hear such is mooted for my favourite from Peirene Press.

 

Please, Peirene. Please don’t come up with something as inappropriate as Witch Hunt, the singularly awful and misleading title that was inflicted on the paperback edition of Susan Fletcher’s superb Corrag.

 

June 27 –  Want to be one of the characters

i’m very specific about this.  I want to be Natasha in Tolstoy’s War and Peace.  Her fiancé, Prince Andrey Bolkonsky, has been my literary crush since forever.

June 28 – Bought at my favourite independent bookshop

“Meandering in Marylebone” has become a euphenism for visiting the legendary Daunt’s Books in Marylebone High Street. I never exit that shop with bank balance intact.  Fortunately I live 387 miles away.  This was the purchase I made in May.

 

June 29 – Most reread

English O-level teacher 5 (To Kill A Mockingbird) German A-level teacher 5 (Effi Briest) 

 

June 30 – Would save in a fire

Me, mine and, assuming there’s time, my photograph albums.  My books can be replaced, memories cannot.

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#bookaday June 16 to 22

The fourth consolidation post for my #bookaday entries on Twitter. (Scroll down for the first three). Are you playing? if so, let me know your choices / leave your twitter handle in comments, so I can follow you.

June 16 Can’t believe more people haven’t read ….

Well, actually I can.  Clara won the 2002 Scottish Saltire Prize and it would appear that it’s not a very well-read prize at all.  I live in Scotland and it took me until 2006 to discover it.  I won’t go into raptures about it again, once is enough.  But if you’re part of #readwomen2014, I recommend you give this a go, both to discover a fantastic Scottish author(ess) and the strong admirable role model of Clara Schumann.

June 17 A Future Classic

What makes a book a classic?  Themes that render it timeless and universal.  I’d say that is true of Ferrante’s novel of childhood and adolescence in 1950s Naples, even if it is firmly fixed in time and place.  When does a book become a classic?  50 years after publication.  If so, then there are still a few years to go for this book, originally published and translated in 2012.  Somehow though, I suspect the 50-year threshold will be relaxed in this case, assuming that hasn’t already happened.

 

June 18 – Bought on a recommendation

I forget who recommended this in a blog comment but whoever it was, please accept my belated thanks.  Sound  the Deep Waters is the coupling of Victorian Romantic Poetry with Pre-Raphaelite paintings. Gorgeous …

 

June 19 –  Can’t stop talking about it 

First read in 1978, in the days when I could read Dutch, and rediscovered in 2007, when it finally appeared in English translation, this is one of the top 10 reads of my life. (Original publication date 1958 – same vintage as myself.  Of course, it’s a good ‘un!)  Only one other Hermans is available in English (Beyond Sleep).  Please, Harvill Secker, could we have some more?  There are plenty to choose from.

 

June 20 – Favourite cover

I love books with lots of books on the cover, and I find books with Cadbury’s chocolate purple covers irresistible.   Most of all, however, I love a luxurious cover.  Cue these splendid brocaded Gaskells from the Folio Society.

 

June 21 – Summer Read

I am most definitely not a swimming pool person, but this is one pool I will be dipping into this summer.  Actually will be diving in right after posting this.

 

June 22 – Out-of-print

I have been searching for a new copy of Little Man, What Now since the beginning of the year.  I’ve searched in Glasgow, Edinburgh and London. Even Daunts in Marylebone didn’t have a copy. They had lots of Falladas, but not this.  It’s a puzzle because I don’t think technically it is out-of-print.  The title is still available for order on the Melville House Press website but $25 p&p is not acceptable.  I now have a copy on loan from the Glasgow Goethe Institute and I need to get cracking if I’m to join in the upcoming discussion on the online book club.

 

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#bookaday June 11 to 15

The third consolidation post for my #bookaday entries on Twitter. (Scroll down for the first and second.).  Are you playing? if so, let me know your choices / leave your twitter handle in comments, so I can follow you.

 

june 11 – Secondhand Bookshop Gem

Tennyson’s Poems, illustrated by Rossetti.  Bought from @edinburghbooks, one of the best secondhand bookshops in The West Port of Edinburgh.


June 12 – I pretend to have read it.

Pass.  My tweet on this day says it all.  ” I have more than 1500 books in the TBR.  The only pretending I do is that I’ll read them all one day.” 


June 13 – Makes me laugh

Since reading and reviewing in 2009, I have loaned this book a number of times and all readers have reported fits of laughter.  I feel a reread coming on.


June 14 – A Old Favourite

It’s rare for me to keep a foxed edition on my shelves but this 1967 Penguin edition is the one that helped me through my German ‘A’ level. (Cheating?  Maybe, but we’ve all done it.)  Menzel’s cover painting “Die Schwester des Künstlers im Wohnzimmer” is a pure distillation of Effi’s mood.  In fact, when I unexpectedly spotted the painting, which now hangs in the Neue Pinakothek in Munich,  My heart skipped a beat as I thought “Look,there’s Effi!”  The cover has changed now, but I do not like the current one at all.  It lacks all atmosphere.


June 15 – Favourite Fictional Father

How can it be anyone other than Atticus Finch from To Kill A Mockingbird?   Loving, principled and courageous. What more can you ask for?

 

 

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#bookaday June 6 to June 10

The second consolidation post for my #bookaday entries on Twitter.  (Scroll down for the first.) Are you playing? if so, let me know your choices / leave your twitter handle in comments, so I can follow you.


June 6 – I one I always give as a gift

Simply because my friends are superheroes …. each and every one.

 

June 7 – The one I forgot I owned

The dangers of double stacking book shelves …. I rediscovered this in the back row during #pushkinpress fortnight as I was searching for the Szerb I decided to read for the event.  Just as well, because I was about to buy it again!

June 8 – I have multiple copies of this.

This category could be renamed the book that launched a new bad habit.    I loved Measuring the World so much that I bought myself Die Vermessung  der Welt the next time I was in Germany.  Since then a number of originals been purchased after reading the translation, to reread in the original.  It’s a good intention, I’m sure.  Though, to date, never realised.  

June 9 – A film tie-in

I hate film tie-ins and was quite surprised to find one in the stacks.  It has been marked for culling a couple of times already, but reprieved because of some excellent reviews.  I’ll get to the book and the film some day.

June 10 – It reminds me of someone I love

 

From Roald Dahl’s Revolting Recipes – Bird Pie from The Twits.  Baking this, complete with claws, was the only time I ever earned the “cool” accolade from my son.  You bet – I lost count of the number of times I baked it …  actually, it is pretty tasty!

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